Raspberry Leaf Tea as a Uterine Tonic

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pregnancy

With an interest in tea lately, I was thinking back to raspberry leaf tea. Not everyone is open to the idea, purpose, or taste, but I loved it! Anything to possibly help reduce labour time and complications, I was all for it. Thanks to my amazing midwife for the information listed above about raspberry leaf tea that was included in my folder. I used to make it up by the litre or so and drink it over ice. Yum! Let’s just say, drinking up to three cups a day by 37 weeks was not exactly hard for me.

I have heard arguments both for and against raspberry leaf tea, and it comes down to what you decide. It is important to mention that boxed raspberry leaf tea from most grocery stores will be very different to the actual raspberry leaf tea recommended. I bought mine as loose leaf from a herbal shop. Also, everyone is very different and the amount you drink and other variables will not be the same for every individual.

In my own personal experience, my labour time was definitely reduced, but I did not benefit from the prevention of bleeding after birth as I had a postpartum hemorrhage. Do I still believe in raspberry leaf tea & recommend it to others? Of course. Just look at the vitamins and minerals it contains. That alone is a good enough reason to drink the tea. Raspberry leaf tea is one aspect of preparing your body for birth, and I would not say that the tea does not work just because it didn’t prevent bleeding for me. The shortened labour and reduction of pain was relevant in my labour. I spent the majority of labour at home, starting late at night and thinking that it was going to be a long time and well into the following day before we drove to the birthing centre. Everyone seems to tell you that labour with your first baby is very long time, but Zaedyn Tai was born that following morning at 3:58. Everything happened so fast. I thought that the pressure was either baby’s head or that something was wrong. We rung our midwife, and not able to have a home birth as back up was away, we took the ambulance up only to get there and have Zaedyn born into this world not long after. The ambulance drivers said that I was the most calm woman in labour that they had ever seen. How did I get through the pain of labour? Squeezing a comb in my hand during contractions to hit acupressure points and a hot shower. That’s it! Oh, and 1 dose of homeopathic remedy supporting birth.

As I mentioned before, everyone is different and the tea may or may not work the way that you expect or hope. I cannot promise you any outcomes, but I just wanted to share this information with you so that you know the possibilities from drinking raspberry leaf tea. Seems like an easy way to promote natural childbirth in my opinion, and you and your baby will benefit from the goodness of the tea as well. Lastly, you can continue to drink your leftover raspberry leaf tea after you have had your baby. I planned on bringing some with me to the birthing centre, but we were in a bit of a rush!

If you are considering drinking raspberry leaf tea, remember not to start too early or drink too many cups early on and consult with your midwife or care.

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4 responses »

  1. I keep forgetting to ask my midwife as I bought a box of raspberry leaf tea a couple weeks ago at 18 weeks. Most of my home birth mommy friends say it can be started as early as 15 weeks!

    I think I’ll just wait until my next prenatal to get the go-ahead from the midwife. 🙂

  2. Yip, I have seen boxes and information as well that recommend raspberry leaf tea throughout pregnancy. Definitely ask your midwife as there is a lot of varying information out there. I bought mine for a herbal clinic and was not recommended to drink before 29 weeks :). Keep us posted on what you decide. Are you planning a home birth?

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